Click image below for the USTA Handbook of Tennis Rules and Regulations

2015 Adult 18 & Over State Championship

USTA League programs are team competitions for men and women with NTRP levels of 2.5 to 5.5. Winning local teams advance to the NC State Championship. Winners of the NC State Championship advance to the Southern Sectional Championships (except in the case of the Singles League, and the 65 & over divisions of Mixed Doubles and Combo Doubles).

Quick Links:

The Capital Area league will abide by (with no exceptions) the 2017 NATIONAL USTA LEAGUE REGULATIONS,  the 2017 SOUTHERN SECTIONAL REGULATIONS (website: www.southerntennis.com), the 2017 NORTH CAROLINA REGULATIONS (website: www.nctennis.com), and the 2017 Capital local league rules.

Please note:  It is each player’s responsibility to know the rules and to tend to problems on the court in their proper manner.  It is also a good idea for everyone to familiarize themselves with THE CODE, which is the rule system for unofficiated matches which the Capital Area League will follow. Friend at Court is the official handbook of tennis rules.Click below for more detailed rules and regulations.

USTA League Tennis is an adult recreational tennis program for all players, regardless of skill. Anyone 18 and over can participate. Anyone 55+, 65+ or 70+ years old or over may play in the Senior Division of the League.

The USTA Adult League will begin play late February/early March.  If you are interested in forming a team, registration begins on TennisLink January 1st!


** Please note: If your match is on a Meredith College court, alcohol is NOT allowed on the campus

USTA Spring League

**Use Friend at Court for any questions or rules regarding USTA leagues.


A FRIEND AT COURT
Q. What is a tennis official?
A. A person who helps ensure that any given tennis match is
conducted under the fairest possible conditions. So, ideally,
the official is “a friend at court,” helpful to the players and
the spectators.
Q. Why should I be a tennis official?
A. Because you: 1) love the game; 2) therefore have a keen
interest in seeing that it is played under the best conditions
;
3
) enjoy having first-hand contact with it whereby you can
make a useful contribution to the game, beyond what you
may do or have done as a player.
NOTE: If you are now, or have any idea you would like
to be, a tennis official, and your first three reasons do
not
include at least two of the above—forget it!
—Jack Stahr